Elements of Health · Cook Dinner

15,627 people have taken on rules to modify this element of their health.

Questions and tips about this rule…

These questions and tips are made from the Game Wall.

:)

robhudson has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.half.16 8 · 2,878 pts

I made a massive pile of almond butter curry with lots of veggies and riced cauliflower last night. It was so good.

:) MaryAnn
about 1 year ago

That sounds fabulous!
Is there a recipe that’s easy to share? :-]

:) robhudson
about 1 year ago

I didn’t follow a recipe and used what I had on hand, but the inspiration was from this post which I saw the day before.

http://www.thedefineddish.com/easy-chicken-penang-curry-noodle-bowls/

:) MaryAnn
about 1 year ago

Thanks – that looks awesome!
I really like the idea of substituting almond butter instead of peanut butter.

about 1 year ago

:)

Pradela has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 10 · 273 pts

It’s easier when you don’t do it on your own!

over 2 years ago

:)

theskyis2 has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.half.16 5 · 2,111 pts

I noticed we have people trying to cook dinner, and while it’s not one of my rules, I have been trying to motivate myself more. Want to share simple recipes with each other?

We do chicken caesar pasta salad. Season some chicken breasts with salt and pepper and bake. Cook some whole grain pasta (I like bowties). Wash and tear up a head of romaine. Mix the romaine and cooked pasta and add enough Ken’s light caeser dressing (or another non-creamy Caesar) to coat. Toss together and serve with sliced chicken on top. Crispy fresh romaine plus soft but chewy whole grain pasta makes this really comforting. For our gluten free friends I would also imagine this being tasty with chickpeas. Takes about 20 minutes and could be even less if you got bagged salad and/or skipped the chicken.

:) vmeredythe
almost 4 years ago

Intrigue. I’ve never thought of combining salad and pasta directly together in one dish. Also, there is totally gluten-free pasta. Pasta is my nom. But I agree we should share recipes! Doing new recipes is going to be one of my goals next month.

almost 4 years ago

:)

ActionPopulated has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 10 · 2,164 pts

I’m temporarily moving in with some friends next week while I hustle to line up a new permanent living situation. I’ll probably be able to cook shared meals with their food or share what they’ve made sometimes, but I don’t want to impose and do this all the time. Refrigerator/freezer space will be pretty limited, and there aren’t many restaurants in their neighborhood. (Plus I can’t afford to eat out every day for the up to a month they’re giving me.) I’ll have full use of any kitchen equipment/appliances.

Given these constraints—what are the best few items I should keep in the fridge? What can I keep in my room that’s tasty and healthy and filling and cheap? What kinds of things can I make? I don’t eat much meat and dislike any and all things tomato; other than that anything goes.

:) cairnycolleen
almost 5 years ago

Peanut or almond butter, honey with fruit. Nuts. In the fridge I would have hummus and cheese. I would save the fridge space for things that have to be cold..the rest I would keep in my room.

:) erloteiel
almost 5 years ago

You could try shelf-stable soups and canned tuna or salmon to mix with mayo or whatever condiments. How about celery to go with hummus, cream cheese, almond butter? The stalks are big, but if you cut it into sticks before you put it in the fridge, they could fit in a couple of zipper-top sandwich bags. Also cheese or other flavored crackers or Triscuits.

:) ElsaM
almost 5 years ago

These suggestions sound like what I’d want: nuts, nut butters, a few nutrient-dense refrigerated foods like cheese or hummus.

I’d also supplement with fruits that can be stored at room temperature (depending on your local weather, of course): apples, clementines, dried cherries or figs. Nut butter on apple slices = YUM. Nut butter on apple sprinkled with dried cherries? DOUBLE YUM.

Do you like avocado? I can eat a whole or half for dinner, with a sprinkle of salt or smashed onto a piece of bread. Or if you’re making a sandwich, avocado steps in nicely for the usual condiments that you’d normally keep in a fridge.

Oatmeal? I make mine (in a biiiig bowl so it doesn’t overflow) in the microwave, which means no pot to clean up. Great with nuts or dried fruit or a spoonful of nut butter stirred in. Or maybe granola?

One of my favorite fast solo dinners is a sweet potato, microwaved until tender, topped with refried beans (also microwaved). Very nutritious, very delicious, totally shelf-stable if you can get smallish containers of refried beans. (I used to buy dehydrated shelf-stable refried beans in a carton; if you can find those, they’re pretty good/not great, but extremely convenient.)

almost 5 years ago

:)

healthyrach has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 13 · 452 pts

Hey all,
I’d like to take advantage of the whole freezer meals idea before baby gets here, but me & the freezer have never been BFFs. I’d love to pick the collective brain of my teams/teammates for tips on getting started!

Things you should know:
- I need strategy & supply ideas much more than recipes
- Setting myself up for happy defrosting experiences is my biggest goal
—I want to avoid freezer burn, mystery meals, & long wait times on the defrosting
- I’d like to get a strategy in place to not only plan some freezer meals, but take advantage of leftovers along the way
- I hate heavy containers & cookware, but realize those are probably best for easy freezer-to-oven results (or should I just get some small foil bread loaf thingies??)
-What kind of tape or labels are best for the freezer?

Mucho thanks for your tips!

:) CynthiaR
over 5 years ago

Rachel, will you plan to defrost meals in the fridge and then cook in the oven or a microwave? Or will you plan to defrost in a microwave and then cook in an oven or microwave? Or some of each/all? Sounds like freezer-to-oven from what you have said.

I used to freeze meals in the pans I meant to cook them in BUT lined them with foil (clear wrap/wax paper if m’wave) and then took them out the dish once frozen, sealed them, double-wrapped them (or used a ziploc bag if the size worked) and then labelled the bag with Magic Marker or masking tape + Magic Marker.

The idea was to not have to have a bunch of pans taking up space in the freezer and to have the meals such that I could either just pop them back in the pan, still wrapped, to thaw and bake OR thaw just a little to remove the wrap and then put back in the pan. The former idea saves clean-up on the pan; the latter looks better for guests. ;-)

My old plan was to cook once for three or four or more meals. There are some great books for that, probably online now in blogs, etc. I can remember cooking all Sunday afternoon for the whole week, with a couple of large batches of basics (we were not vegetarians) such as ground meat cooked with bell peppers, onions and garlic that then became Italian, Mexican, Oriental stir-fry or other meals with the addition of different sauces, fresh vegetables, starches, etc. Rice freezes and reheats very well; I was taught (by my mother) never to freeze potatoes but to add them later (not that I followed the advice, mind you).

I’d also take the cooked meat (meat substitute) + garlic, peppers and onions and freeze it in meal-sized batches in ziploc bags (earlier than that I had a seal-a-meal thing) so a meal was half-cooked and I could just add fresh vegetables to make it something else. For stews, chowders and soups I froze in flat packs (Ziploc or Seal-A-Meal) and stacked then in the freezer. Thawed, they could be poured into a saucepan to heat or baked in the oven (as for a stew with dumplings added to it).

My strategy was to do the messy stuff and chopping etc in one big batch/at one time so there was one major cleanup and the main course was half- or fully prepared. Whatever remained could be easily done so that dinner was on the table in a short time.

When my daughter was having her kids, before I left after my month there after each of the births was to cook up a storm the last week and leave her big freezer filled with ready meals for after I was gone. She always told me what a sad day it was when the last meal was gone. So I think your plans are sound!

I look forward to everyone else’s more current and up-to-date suggestions. What a great request for thoughts.

:) kaizenkaren
over 5 years ago

I think Cynthia has said it all. I do use the Food Saver vacuum gizmo. It’s great. Good luck to you.

:) MaryAnn
over 5 years ago

Not sure this suits all of your preferences, but just to toss my hat in the ring….

I make soups and stews in a very big pot, and make enough for about 20 good-sized, almost-3-cup servings. So, 10 meals for the 2 of us. I keep about half of it in the fridge, to eat during the following week, and freeze the other half – so we end up with 10 servings (5 meals for 2) frozen for later.

I think that’s kind of excessive compared to the volumes that most people cook, but that’s what makes it seem worthwhile for me. It does take some hours to prepare that much food.

I use the rectangular plastic containers (boxes) and lids made by Ziploc, for freezer use. They’re free of the worst toxins (bpa), and the lids are sufficiently water-tight.

However, no matter what any manufacturer says, I would not ever put anything but glass or pottery/ceramic in the microwave — nor would I ever use plastic wrap, or even waxed paper, in microwave (if you’re concerned about toxins in food).

THe Ziploc boxes come in various shapes and sizes.
But they don’t solve your need for fast thawing — if I want that, I need to take them out of the freezer ahead of time, or shift them to the fridge overnight. If I forget to do that, it’s a slow thaw for something like stew or soup, in a saucepan on the stovetop. But that doesn’t usually bother me. I add a little water, set the heat on medium (or low to begin with), and just do something else for an hour or so, coming back to look & stir once in a while.

If I’m putting the contents right from freezer into pot, I let warm water run over the outside of the container, until the frozen block loosens enough to get it out.

To me, this is a “happy defrosting experience”. But maybe it wouldn’t be happy enough for you. :-) Maybe that smiley face makes it happier. ;)

The reason I went for these Ziploc boxes is that, after lots of experimenting with different kinds of plastic bags, I found that a solid container is so much easier to fill (with liquidy stuff like stew), and so much easier to deal with (stack) in the freezer.

For me, plastic bags and the like slide around and don’t stack well. Every time I tried to do anything in the freezer, I’d have to catch and reorganize the frigging plastic bags. And those 2 things (filling, and stacking/organizing in the freezer) turned out to be the biggest pains-in-the-neck for me.

I just label each box, with the name of the contents, and the date. I usually use little rectangles of paper with scotch tape, but masking tape is probably much more expedient.

:) MaryAnn
over 5 years ago

I don’t know exactly what this is:
- flat packs (Ziploc or Seal-A-Meal) – from Cynthia
or this:
- Food Saver vacuum gizmo – from Karen

Maybe those things would be better for you than the Ziploc boxes I use.

:) CynthiaR
over 5 years ago

Ah, Ziploc boxes! They came onto the market after I left the US, though I have lusted after them on visits and occasionally bought a few and smuggled them away. My daughter uses them.

Here is a current U.S. version of Seal-a-Meal. I had one of the originals, 30+ years ago.
http://www.amazon.com/Seal-a-Meal-VS108-P-Vacuum-Sealer/dp/B009EQJTFS

Good info on bpa’s etc, thank you. I knew there would be newer data than I had/knew. I feel fortunate having lived in the UK and now here, I guess, because the EU regulations and those in Australia/NZ are more stringent about toxins and additives than the US (though I don’t know about Canada at all). I thank my stars that GMO foods are forbidden (and I don’t buy food from China because they do horrible things to make it more appealing and who knows what else).

Good catch on ‘wax paper’ by Mary Ann. My mother’s term; she used to wrap our school sandwiches in itI actually use ‘parchment paper’ and have, I guess, since 1999. I have never seen ‘waxed paper’ in the UK or Malaysia—old vocabulary, sorry. The box claims that it is bpa-free (UK brand), and I believe the takeaway boxes we get are as well. They were in the UK, should check these.

:) kaizenkaren
over 5 years ago

Check out foodsaver.com. I find that I enjoy using it and that I actually do use it.

:) MaryAnn
over 5 years ago

You know what – I don’t even trust “parchment paper”.
Maybe it’s bpa-free, but what other kind of shit is in it?
When you heat things up to high temperatures, plus put food oils on them, all kinds of things leach out into the food.
The thing is, the regulations around all this stuff are so poor – we really aren’t protected very well from what manufacturers put in the stuff we buy.

Look at non-stick coatings, for example. I used that stuff for years, and some people still think it’s safe. But not me. And now they’re selling all kinds of silicone baking ware. Maybe that’s safe, but the amount of research required to figure that out, is more than I can do.

I know it’s not possible to eliminate ALL risk from exposure to toxins, but I try my best. I know too many people who have, or who have died from, cancer (not to mention other diseases like MS, that may be related to environmental toxins), to fool around with this stuff.

So for cooking – I stick to stainless steel, tempered glass, and crockery/pottery (IF the latter is made in a place that seems trustworthy. That excludes China, for sure.)

:) MaryAnn
over 5 years ago

I do use plastic (Saran) wrap, waxed paper, and parchment paper — but only cold, not when heating food up.

:) SusanT
over 5 years ago

Obviously a lot of great info here already, but I have a few thoughts:

- I like a black sharpie directly on the foil or ziplock bag for labeling.
-
I love having cooked, chopped chicken or turkey in the freezer to be able to add to a soup or casserole.
- seems like one of the best tips I’ve heard is to work with a friend and both end up with twice the variety and twice the food.
-
I always had a challenge remembering to defrost in time but with a smart phone and a calendar app, that seems to be a non-issue
— ziplock bags are good for storage and can be cut away from frozen food

:) SusanT
over 5 years ago

Mysterious strike through! I really do like black sharpie!

:) 3-aussies
over 5 years ago

Okay – I’ll pop in my survival strategy that healthily and easily (low cost and very freezer friendly) got me through grad school.

Every Sunday I got fruit and veggies and bread and eggs and milk groceries to make fresh breakfasts and lunches. Then 1x/month I went to the grocery store and got the ingredients to make 6 different dinners. They were: cous-cous; lentil soup; chili; refried beans; spaghetti sauce; and split-pea soup. These 6 dinners were had every week for 2 years! They freeze very well and I had to choose foods that I liked the taste of and were healthy because I couldn’t rely on being creative nor have the energy available to think!

Of course thus left 1 free night each week when whatever happened happened which allowed me to keep sane.

BTW I froze them in containers that fit the fridge and used masking tape and black markers to say what they were: CC; chili; spag; lentil; SP;RB. Also I had only 4 containers for each: one for each week so it made it really easy.

Freezer burn couldn’t happen; everything got used; and there was enough variety that I could handle it.

PS. If there were evenings of unexpected company this too meant that it could be easily managed.

The big deal is one full day of grocery shopping, cutting and preparing all the Mel’s ONLY ONCE A MONTH!

Good luck and make it enjoyable.

:) Craig Carignan
over 5 years ago

I’d have the husband BBQ/Grill alot. Just saying that’s what I do when the wife isn’t feeling up to it.

:) kaizenkaren
over 5 years ago

3-aussies, wow. That’s good.

:) healthyrach
over 5 years ago

Thanks for all the freezer meals info guys!

From what I’m seeing, the BPA-free plastic ziplock containers sound decent, on the assumption that being home from work will improve my track record for defrosting.

I did pick up a glass ziplock container that claims to go from freezer to oven (up to a certain temperature), for about $7. I think that might be an easy way to go – maybe even cost-effective given the circumstances?

I have a suspicion that freezing cooked meats is worth exploring.

Last few days I haven’t had much chance to explore this further, but I will report my findings once I’m able bring it back to the top of my list! :-)

:) kaizenkaren
over 5 years ago

Thanks for the tip

over 5 years ago

:)

Ramon has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 10 · 596 pts

just eat vegetable

over 5 years ago

:)

sperose has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.half.16 7 · 2,693 pts

Here’s the lasagna soup recipe:

I cobbled together this recipe from a few different places:
http://backtoherroots.com/2011/11/02/slow-cooker-lasagna-soup/
http://www.anediblemosaic.com/?p=8847
http://kitchentrialanderror.blogspot.com/2012/04/slow-cooker-lasagna-soup.html

Soup:
1-1.5 lbs ground beef
28 oz can of tomato puree (not sauce)
6 oz can tomato paste
6 cups chicken broth (not stock)
2 fist sized yellow onions diced
5 diced garlic cloves
1-1.5 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper

Seasoned Ricotta:

1 of the big tubs of ricotta (I want to say mine was 32oz, but I’m not sure.)
1 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1 tsp dried oregano

Put all soup ingredients into crock (yes, the ground beef is raw, just fluff it with your fingers when you put it in) and cook on low for 8-10 hours. (Most recipes call for a shorter time than that, but I was out of the house 10 hours and it worked for me.)

When you get home, crumble up a box of lasagna noodles (or you can use smaller noodles, ’tevs) and stir those in, along with a good sprinkling of rosemary and thyme.

Turn to high for about 10 minutes. While the noodles are doing their thing, mix together all the seasoned ricotta ingredients.

Get a bowl and scoop in a decent amount of ricotta (maybe 1/4-1/2 cup ish?). Pour some soup over top of that. Sprinkle with some shredded mozzarella.

Nom.

The first night it still had some soup-like-ness to it, but not much. By the next morning however—it was fork-like. I happen to like super thick fork-like soups, so keep that in mind. It might stay somewhat soupier if you use smaller noodles.

You can also use diced tomatoes or crushed tomatoes, but chunks of tomatoes gross me out, so I always go with a puree.

Also, I used one of those crockpot liners that are stupidly expensive AND THEY ARE FUCKING AMAZING. Seriously, I’m going to use my crockpot more often because of it.

over 5 years ago

:)

Starfevre has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.half.16 6 · 10,942 pts

I have a question for the hive mind. I can’t decide on my answer to this. Does making a smoothie that I’m going to drink for dinner (one with leafy greens in it) count as ‘cooking dinner’? Nothing actually gets ‘cooked’. If it does then I made this rule for myself really easy, but on the other hand, I don’t really ‘cook’ cook very often since smoothies are healthy the way I make them, entirely fruits and vegetables.

:) sbacante
over 5 years ago

Why did you picked this rule? it is to avoid take out or junk food? or because you want to make a warm meal from scratch (maybe with a minimum number of ingredients and tools you must use)?
To me as long as you start from scratch (in your case from cleaning and chopping the veggies) it is sort of cooking

:) Karen B.
over 5 years ago

If your goal in choosing this rule was simply to have a healthy dinner that is prepared by you, I would think the smoothie would be fine, as would a meal fixed in the microwave or by any other method. If your reason for the rule was to spend a certain amount of time and work on actually “cooking”, then that’s different… :)

:) Bridget
over 5 years ago

intent of rule rules for me.
an ice cream sundae would meet criteria for me if I spooned it into the bowl. certainly a salad would count.
for me that rule is mostly about not having my husband make dinner and not getting carry-out.

:) Starfevre
over 5 years ago

Thanks S and Karen. I think I’ve clarified this a little in my head. I would consider making roasted vegetables to be cooking and the only substantial difference between making roasted veggies and making a smoothie is turning on an oven rather than turning on a blender. That’s a rather arbitrary distinction to make. I’m really trying to be healthier and not eat freezer food or takeout as much so I think I’ll make it so that anything that involves handling fresh ingredients is cooking. Thanks.

:) Starfevre
over 5 years ago

Thanks also bridget, your comment hadn’t appeared when I made mine. The intent of my rule is to eat healthier so using the microwave to steam a vegetable is cooking but using it to heat up a freezer meal is not.

:) MaryAnn
over 5 years ago

Glad you sorted it out for yourself.
I would have “seconded” what the other three said, i.e., depends on the intention or goal you had.

:) EvaC
over 5 years ago

Applying heat is irrelevant. Intentional preparation of healthy food is “cooking” for this purpose.

:) Cithra
over 5 years ago

I’ll chime in late to say that for me, using the blender would totally count as cooking, since the thing I would be trying to avoid is just eating crackers out of the box for a meal. So any kind of preparation that involves making dishes I have to wash counts as cooking. (Wow, I hadn’t realized that my definition had so much to do with clean-up rather than the actual activity. Thanks for the opportunity to think this through! It is a rule I have flirted with adding but never actually chosen.)

over 5 years ago

:)

sbrader has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.half.16 9 · 48 pts

Guys—I’m a terrible, impatient cook, but I really want to save money and eat better next month. What’s your favorite EASY thing to make that won’t make me pull my hair out and is also good for me? I’m at a loss…

:) vivikush
almost 6 years ago

Stir fry. It practically cooks itself, it’s an easy way to cram veggies into a meal, and it stretches your meat if you are on a budget. Just stir and fry.

:) Langy
almost 6 years ago

That’s exactly what I do, Vicki.

:) sbrader
almost 6 years ago

Thanks for the tip! Excellent idea!

:) rawlings
almost 6 years ago

Stew is a great standby… chop some onions, garlic, potatoes, carrots, or whatever you like (or whatever you have leftover); add a handful of lentils, rice, or quinoa; add some spices you like; and simmer for a while.

almost 6 years ago

:)

mimoy has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 11 · 746 pts

why you like cooking?

:) SusanT
about 6 years ago

I love knowing exactly what is in the food I am eating and I enjoy using high quality ingredients. I love seeing and tasting the finished product.

about 6 years ago

:)

RosieMBanks has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 15 · 3,517 pts

This might be a silly question, but I’m a n00b at Health Month: Does “reheating leftovers of a dinner you cooked from scratch” count as “cooking dinner?” I cook for one (the cat doesn’t count, sorry!) and there are ALWAYS leftovers.

If the answer is “no” then, well, I’ll have a full freezer at the end of the month and ready meals for days!

:) marmot
about 6 years ago

I say yes. You cooked it the first time. Reheating takeout would not count. :)

that’s the beauty of Health Month—you’re accountable to yourself and you can tweak the rules as you go along. Lots of folks count all their rules as done if they are sick, for example.

:) sperose
about 6 years ago

Reheating stuff you’ve already made totes counts as making dinner.

:) RosieMBanks
about 6 years ago

Thanks marmot and sperose! I won’t have to drown in leftovers! (though cooking and freezing whole batches of food for later is a good idea…if I can get around to it…)

:) bilabial
about 6 years ago

absolutely counts!

:) ShiuMaiBaby
about 6 years ago

I say yes! It’s not eating out, therefore, it’s making dinner.

about 6 years ago

:)

ziafmihar has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.half.16 9 · 1,627 pts

cook by yourself more cheaper more healthy

over 6 years ago

:)

aespiegel has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.half.16 1 · 744 pts

What are some fast yet healthy meals to cook for dinner?

over 6 years ago

:)

Bridget has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.half.16 6 · 3,595 pts

5 Kitchen Tools That Moonlight as Other Things
http://www.americastestkitchenfeed.com/curious-shortcuts/2011/09/5-kitchen-tools-that-moonlight-as-other-things/

I think using muffin tins w/ paper liners will make cookie decorating easier. And never have enough cooling racks.

:) healthyrach
over 6 years ago

Ooh, me likey.

:) healthyrach
over 6 years ago

If I ever try to make indian or thai food, that muffin tin idea will be a great help!

:) pelly
over 6 years ago

That tip about making multiple loaves of bread at once actually made a cameo appearance in my dreams last night.

My brain does weird things sometimes.

:) Bridget
over 6 years ago

I’m not so sure about that loaf pan in a longer pan. If the loaf pan sides flared outward the loaves to the left and right would taper in from bottom. I decided that would be fine for home loaves. The middle loaf could be the give away.

Wondering about that dream, PM.

over 6 years ago

:)

bhetz has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.half.16 7 · 941 pts

cek

over 6 years ago

:)

söckli has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.empty.16 -3 · 1,594 pts

What shall i cook for my guests tomorrow?

:) melakko
over 6 years ago

Be the first to start the fondue season! :)

:) Noshire
over 6 years ago

Fajita Fiesta ftw :)

:) söckli
over 6 years ago

tacos for everybody!

over 6 years ago

:)

Bajonista has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 12 · 3,570 pts

Does preparing a salad for lunch count as “cook dinner?” I already made a note to myself to consider “dinner” a meal.

:) Matilda444
over 6 years ago

It counts!

:) meiryrodriguez
over 6 years ago

definitely.

over 6 years ago

:)

lv3121 has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 12 · 9,389 pts

Please kindly cook dinner min 5 days a week :)

:) Nikkooo
over 6 years ago

#Merdeka

over 6 years ago

:)

Nikkooo has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 11 · 5,278 pts

Please kindly cook dinner min 5 days a week :)

:) lv3121
over 6 years ago

#Merdeka

over 6 years ago

:)

Demetrias has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.half.16 9 · 4,082 pts

I’m a sporadic (ahem) cook, but being part of a Community Supported Fishery venture has brought fresh, locally-caught fish into my kitchen twice a week so far this summer. Just made this recipe tonight — and wow! Healthy, delicious, and super-easy (… if anything, the listed prep-time overestimates the time needed :) Just wanted to pass it on:

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Baked-Maryland-Lump-Crab-Cakes/Detail.aspx

:) DavidB
almost 7 years ago

Wow, sounds like a great benefit! and a good recipe.

almost 7 years ago

:)

nalgarito has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 11 · 2,099 pts

Al terminar de partir cebolla o pelar ajo, y antes de lavarse las manos, froten un poco de tomate o limón en sus manos, dejen reposar unos segundos y después procedan a lavar, no les quedará rastro alguno!

:) nbrx
almost 7 years ago

Ese es un genial #consejodedomestica

almost 7 years ago

:)

jhiggins23 has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 10 · 10,537 pts

One thing I am starting to realize is if you live alone cooking dinner everyday is hard. Especially if you are like me and this month you have cook dinner & avoid seconds. Sometimes I feel when I go to the store the portions they give is not made for someone who is single. Anyway what I started doing is instead of cooking a meal and trying to ration it out prior to cooking. I cook the whole thing and before I sit down to eat I put the rest away for the next day. This really helps with my karate classes because then I can make sure I eat before karate and I don’t have to worry about cooking after I completely exhausted on class days. I hope this helps. It is also a big time saver too.

:) hariansi_panimba
almost 7 years ago

like karate? i am from asia but i can’t karate. LOL

:) jhiggins23
almost 7 years ago

Yes I take a form of kenpo. Which is a lot of fun :0

:) hariansi_panimba
almost 7 years ago

wow,i wanna try too but i do not have skill to do that

nice to know you jessica. :)

:) beowulf28
almost 7 years ago

Great idea, Jess!

almost 7 years ago

:)

corazon has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 11 · 3,100 pts

:) funbobby99
about 7 years ago

Thanks for your posts, Laviria.
One favor: please post only full messages so as not to take up extra space on the Game Wall.
Thanks!
AJ

:) corazon
about 7 years ago

okay i’m sorry

about 7 years ago

:)

MissEve has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 10 · 0 pts

do you like cooking for your dinner?

about 7 years ago

:)

eohone has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.empty.16 -2 · 1,061 pts

After failing to make dinner for myself for a couple weeks now, does anyone have some super fast dinner tips- or tips on making it to the kitchen to cook when all I really want to do is buy something to eat?

:) Jay
about 7 years ago

cook pasta. stir in can of tomatoes. sprinkle of dried basil and pepper. eat :)

:) fireminx
about 7 years ago

salads! pastas! breakfast for dinner!

about 7 years ago

:)

lorisgirl has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.half.16 3 · 2,159 pts

I made soup yesterday, but I have a hard time doing a broth that’s actually yummy, it’s usually just warm water with seasoning. Not too bad, but not exactly what I had in mind either. Anyone has a tip on how to make better broth? I’m using carrots and beef, and I’m only using fresh ingredients, no mixes or ready-made broth.

:) hhafizhan
about 7 years ago

would you mind giving me a sponsorship? please if you don’t mind. thanks before :)

:) lorisgirl
about 7 years ago

you don’t need sponsoring, you’re playing the free game.

:) hhafizhan
about 7 years ago

but i want to play the purple brackets

:) lorisgirl
about 7 years ago

I recommend playing on the yellow bracket first. After you’ve proven you can follow a few rules, then you should move to the higher brackets! So far, I see you haven’t finished a month. How about you finish three months in a row before you look for sponsoring? :) Good luck!

:) hhafizhan
about 7 years ago

ok thank you so much :) but if i have finished my game, could you sponsor me please?

:) lorisgirl
about 7 years ago

seriously, dude, I am looking at your past games, you never even started one yet. I highly recommend playing the yellow bracket before you move up. Starting with a too big goal will only get you frustrated. This is about improving your habits, so make sure you’re selecting good goals that you can actually follow through. If you have that much you want to improve, do it step by step.

:) hhafizhan
about 7 years ago

ok thanks :)

:) timetosail
about 7 years ago

Laura, about making a tasty broth – I don’t know if you would consider this “cheating”, but if you purchase some beef bouillion cubes and throw one in, that would really add to the taste. To make a good chicken broth, without even using chicken bouillon, I take one of those store cooked chickens and after slicing some off for lunch or dinner – throw the chicken in a pot covered with water, add an onion and 3 or 4 bayleaves, bring to a boil and then simmer for 90 minutes or so, covered & add a bit more water if necessary. Then you can throw in carrots, celery, & potatoes if you like and spice to taste (I use lots of marjoram or basil if I don’t have marjoram) and simmer for another 30 minutes or so. Have fun!

:) lorisgirl
about 7 years ago

Hey Hilary! I’m not a big fan of the cubes, as they usually have to much sodium, but I’ll certainly try this chicken broth recipe. I’ll use the leftover chicken on the weekend and will let you know how it went :) thanks!

about 7 years ago

:)

LadyLoufa has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 10 · 1,321 pts

Usually healthier and usually cheaper… Makes you happy inside!

over 7 years ago

:)

erjey has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 12 · 717 pts

what’s your dinner last night???

over 7 years ago

:)

corazon has a tip for the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 10 · 1,573 pts

i can’t cook .. so i can’t share this tip :) LOL

over 7 years ago

:)

ssitt has a question about the Cook dinner rule.

Heart.full.16 10 · 0 pts

easy cooking for first cook.

over 7 years ago